Tag Archive: estimates

Tech Sector In The Driver’s Seat For US Relative Performance

In this post, we highlight the interaction of US outperformance versus the rest of the world this year and US Technology relative to Ex-US Technology.

  • First, the relative performance of the US equity market versus the rest of the world has been highly correlated with the relative performance of US Technology stocks relative to Ex-US Technology stocks.
  • Second, the outperformance of US Technology, and by extension the major US indices versus their non-US counterparts, looks likely to continue based on relative earnings estimate revisions patterns.

The chart below supports our first point. The US has outperformed the rest of the world this year by a healthy margin, based on the MSCI regional benchmark indices, as shown in the top section (plotted using rolling five-day averages). The lower section isolates the Technology sectors for the US and the Ex-US universe (also using MSCI indices) and plots the relative return of the US versus Ex-US Technology sectors.

US vs Ex US and Technology Relative Returns

We can see the close parallels in the charts for the year-to-date: as US Tech outperforms Ex-US Tech, so does the broader US market outperform the Ex-US aggregate. This in some ways seems unsurprising given the heavy weight that the Tech sector holds in the US compared to many non-US markets, but the relative weights are unrelated to the relative performance of the US versus Ex-US Tech sectors. We find that even after removing the effects of sector weightings, US stocks have outperformed Ex-US stocks this year, and this effect is particularly strong within the Technology sector.

Our second point is captured in the chart below. It shows our measure of aggregated earnings estimate revisions (the percentage of analysts raising versus lowering earnings estimates) for the US Tech sector and the entire Global Tech sector (which includes the US).

Technology Sector Revisions Breadth Metrics

We can see here that earlier this year, US and Global Technology estimate revisions (fundamental trends) were mostly moving closely together and slightly favored non-US Tech (US Tech revisions were slightly weaker than Global Tech revisions).  Both revision metrics improved sharply from the April lows through today. But the difference between the US and the Global Technology sector earnings estimate measures moved dramatically in favor of the US in July after Q2 earnings reports came out, and have generally remained there ever since. This suggests that US Technology stocks have a strong fundamental tailwind relative to Tech stocks outside the US right now. If that US Technology tailwind persists, the broader US market seems likely to resume outperforming the rest of the world in the coming months.

Is the rebound in earnings estimate revisions peaking?

Our measures of aggregated earnings estimate revisions trends have shown some of their most dramatic movements on record this year, and now may be looking extended.

After reaching historically extreme negative readings in April/May amid the initial COVID-19 lockdowns, earnings estimate revisions activity has now lurched back up to extremely positive readings. Better-than-expected Q2 earnings reports and the effects of massive monetary and fiscal stimulus are now finally reflected in analyst earnings forecasts. However, with fiscal stimulus weakening (and little imminent sign of movement toward new stimulus) and no meaningful further scope for interest rate cuts, the “snap-back” in earnings estimate activity could soon drop off.

The first chart below shows our measure of aggregated analyst earnings estimate revision activity in the US, for our broad universe of over 2000 stocks (equally-weighted) on a longer-term time frame. The data are month-end values except for the latest data point.  The red line represents the “breadth” of estimate revisions, meaning the aggregate net proportion of positive versus negative revisions (changes) to forward 12-month earnings estimates over the prior three months (i.e., number of analysts who have raised earnings forecasts minus the number who have reduced forecasts, as a percentage of the total number of analysts for each stock, scale right). The blue bars represent the “magnitude” of the month-on-month changes in forward 12-month forecasts, i.e., the average percentage change in earnings forecasts from a month ago (scale left).

United States_AbsERS

We can see that the low point in April matched (or exceeded) the extremes seen in the 2008 Great Financial Crisis (GFC) period, which is not surprising given that the drop-off in economic activity this year was greater than in the GFC. However, the combined fiscal and monetary stimulus recently produced in response was also greater than any previous post-WWII period, and so revisions metrics have shown a faster and more extreme rebound than at any previous point in our data. Stock prices appear to have moved ahead of aggregate estimate revisions, raising the question of whether this apparent good news for earnings is already priced in.

Perhaps more concerning is the risk that revisions (i.e., analyst sentiment) have reached highly optimistic readings now and may already be starting to revert. The chart below is calculated identically to the one above, but plots the daily figures (rather than monthly) over the last three years. Here we can see that the blue bars are already coming down from their latest peak, suggesting that the upward momentum of earnings estimate revisions may be fading now that Q2 earnings reports are over. The breadth series (red line) is based on revisions over the last three months, so it encompasses a full calendar quarter and is thus more stable. If revisions breadth starts to turn down (as it did after the tax-cut surge in early 2018) alongside current elevated valuations for equities, then the recent signs of higher stock market volatility could persist into Q4.

United States_AbsERS_Daily

Earnings uncertainty still extremely high going into Q2 reporting season

July 10, 2020

As Q2 earnings season gets underway, the level of uncertainty about future earnings among analysts remains extremely high. Despite somewhat calmer equity market activity recently, our data shows that the level of disagreement among analysts regarding earnings over the next 12 months (NTM) is still well above the highest levels reached in the Great Financial Crisis (2008-09) period (chart below).

US Estimate Disperson

The chart plots monthly (and latest) readings for the average dispersion of analyst forecasts around the mean for US stocks (standard deviation of estimates as a percentage of the mean estimate for each stock, averaged across all stocks in our 2300-stock US universe*). A higher dispersion number indicates a wider range of estimates (more disagreement about the level of future earnings) for the average stock. The solid horizontal line is the long-run average, and the dashed lines are +/- 1 standard deviation from the average.

One reason for the extreme level of disagreement among analysts is that a record number of companies have withdrawn their usual earnings guidance in light of the uncertainty surrounding the impact of COVID-19 and related government responses.

And equity analysts, like many other workers, have also been forced to work from home and unable to travel to visit companies, attend conferences, and gather information as they normally would. So with less scope to do their own legwork and less input from company management, analysts have far less information to work with now than usual.

These limitations on information access, alongside the obvious difficulty of predicting economic activity and earnings in an unprecedented global health crisis, no doubt help explain why there is little confidence about forecasting future earnings. We might therefore expect to see a greater number of earnings surprises when companies release their results.

And while theory suggests that higher earnings uncertainty would normally prompt investors to reduce the valuations given to equities, that has not been the case recently as aggressive stimulus from central banks and government spending have in fact pushed equity valuations much higher.

*Note: our US universe includes stocks with at least three analysts covering them, a minimum $200 million market cap, and at least $2 million/day average trading volume.